The Reverse Side of the Industrial World in Art

Shocking material from the Photographers’ Gallery displaying the reverse side of the medal in vehicles industry.

When you go to the gallery, it is always nice to see beautiful roses and sunsets. But, this time be prepared to something completely different. Recently opened Photographers’ Gallery has undertaken a powerful start with a number of significant artists. Anybody who have ever seen any kind of vehicle in his life must be flipping out from the view that opens to you at the Burtynsky oil exhibition. The ugly truth is skilfully unveiled and put on canvas for public attention.

Enter the ground floor of the modern building and follow the signs. The Gallery is quite spacious, but you will easily find your way. Taking the stairs is not too exhausting, but there is always an elevator in case you really can’t handle it.

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The major part of the Gallery is devoted to Edward Burtynsky’s industrial landscapes, displaying such elements of modern existence as massive highways, piles of rubbish and the oil fields. “Officially” it is classified into three groups: Extraction and Refinement, Transportation and Motor Culture. This is a wonderful visual metaphor for the contemporary lifestyle, a metaphor, that does not need additional explanation or commentaries. Looking at these imperfect sceneries we start giving account of what is the real cost of our comfort and, as the brochure puts it what is “our dependence on this finite resource”

Edward Burtynsky OC is a Canadian photographer and artist who has achieved international recognition for his large-format photographs of industrial landscapes. His work is housed in more than fifteen major museums including the Guggenheim Museum, the National Gallery of Canada, and the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris. (wiki)

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Napu Bridge Interchange, Shanghai, China, 2004

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Oil Fields 19 a&b, Belridge, California, USA, 2003

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Oxford Tire Pile, Westley, California, USA, 1999Untitled

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Shipbreaking, Chittagong, Bangladesh, 2000Untitled

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Sikorski Helicopter Scarp Yard, Tuscon, Arizona, USA, 2006

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All in all, Burtynsky’s works are more than impressive. Unfortunately, the current exhibition was only available till the 1st of July. Fortunately, this article will be live a considerable amount of time. So, don’t hesitate to put like, and/or comment it. However, if you ever get the chance to see Burtynsky live, I strongly recommend it for enriching your “cultural potential”.

And as a p.s., I’d like to introduce you to the works of Raqs Media Creative, a group of artists from India. The two available works from these artists could be seen below.

An afternoon Unregistered on the Richter Scale, 2011 – a silent looped video projection that transforms an archival photograph, taken in Calcutta in 1911 through a series of subtle alterations. (The official brochure from the Photographers’ Gallery)

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36 Planes of Emotion (2011) – an installation, depicting different emotional states.

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Comments
8 Responses to “The Reverse Side of the Industrial World in Art”
  1. Very interesting, great! Thanks.

  2. I love this! the strange abstract beauty in industrial photography is fascinating…
    Thanks for sharing!

  3. Thank you so much for your appreciation! I am really glad you enjoyed it!

    UC

  4. susanalley says:

    WOW! How “ordinary” stuff can be so outstandingly “unordinary”
    Thank you for sharing.

    Namaste

  5. Walter Demars says:

    Aw, this was a really nice post. In idea I would like to put in writing like this additionally – taking time and actual effort to make a very good article… but what can I say… I procrastinate alot and by no means seem to get something done.

  6. Laraine Kuzmish says:

    I like checking your writing, this page was included in my favorites in chrome.

  7. vilks12 says:

    As usually – good pictures ! And I very like your language !
    May be send it to some newspaper too….. 🙂

  8. Popusti says:

    I couldn’t refrain from commenting. Very well written!

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